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Showing posts from May, 2017

Give it away. So there's nothing left.

Part of the Christian faith is framed in the message of Agape love. That is, to give as Christ gave, in the sense that you expect nothing in return.

It's not always easy. To me, that means leaving a little piece of yourself behind, every time you help or set an example for another.

Much of my motivation is to support and develop future leaders among university students. That may be in the form of listening and saying little in return. Or, making short prompting comments that lead a discussion - and learning opportunity - to a deeper level.

As Master Competitor, much of what I have left won't be age group wins, or a PR in ultras. It's modeling fitness and enjoyment of outdoor engagement. To be "my age" and knock out a 14 mile out and back on rugged trail can set a standard where "if he can do it, so can I!"

To stay aware that I must encourage all, to leave no one behind. To meet each student where they are, on that day in their maturity and development …

I quit, I'm back. What makes a runner?

Thought I hit the threshold on running. I was simply tired. Running became more of a struggle than enjoyment. I was slipping...from 9 minute miles, to 10, then 12. I was ashamed.

I was running in my hometown in Wisconsin. A friend drove by in his truck and yelled "If that's all the faster you can go, better head straight to the hospital!" Maybe funny to him, but that narrative broke my psychological bank. I was done.

So, six months progressed. I became a walker. Still OK, did 4-6 miles a day and did Total Gym. Also cycling on the weekends, many times 50+ miles.

But, I was empty inside. I realized running drove everything else. My identity, my motivation to eat well, my desire to set goals.

I am a runner in my mind. So now, I am back.

Currently traveling in Greece. Went out for a shuffle in Santorini, 30 minutes out and back. Mostly down on the way up, climbing on the way back. One hour and 12.5 minutes a mile.

Sure it's not a stellar race pace. But I am 60 years old.…

10 day Total Gym: Optimize for every age

I've been posting on my Facebook feed, for the past 10 days. On these concluding remarks, I wanted to share across my Master Competitor blog platform. I had been reading recent research on how slow motion weight resistance is most beneficial. I applied that to my daily Total Gym workout and wrote about it.

Lessons to consider:

1) Do something, every day. My "secret" to fitness at 60 years old is to keep on, keeping on. Left foot, right foot, walk your journey every day. Not all of it will be stellar. Some is mundane. On those days when things aren't well or right, do a little bit. It's mental, emotional, to stay engaged.

2) Fight back. I had a couple of junk food days, bad decision making. Sure, I felt bad. But I focus my mind on resilience. I was also transitioning off a (bad idea for me) low carb diet. It just doesn't work well for vegetarians (I have been one for 17 years). If you look at the ketosis charts, many suggest less than 100 grams of carbs a day. I …

Health Care Scare: Americans can't shoot the gap to coverage

Two recent news reports indicate that most Americans will not be able to activate their health care coverage if a medical event occurs.

National Public Radio (NPR) reported that 90 percent of individuals buying insurance under the Affordable Care Act (ACA) choose plans with $3000 deductibles or higher. Deductibles are the amount that the insured person must pay, before the health insurance policy starts to cover medical costs.

It's clear that high deductibles are a disaster for many. A recent study by Bankrate.com indicates 63% of U.S. residents would not be able to cover a $500 unexpected expense.

High deductibles, no cash at home. Consider parents, who receive a call from their son's grade school. The boy took a fall on the playground and has broken his wrist. Once inside the door at the emergency room, most of the $3000 has already been spent. 

Lawdictionary.com tells us first, you'll need an X-ray to confirm the bone break, for $150 to $220. Then a possible CT scan could b…

Lance vs. U.S. Postal: Show them the money

It's going to court, after all. The $100 million lawsuit against Lance Armstrong will proceed to trial. U.S. District Judge Christopher Cooper ruled in favor of the federal government, which is suing on behalf of the U.S. Postal Service. U.S. Postal sponsored Lance from 2000 to 2004 and it is reported that $32.3 million was invested. The case states U.S. Postal would not have funded the Tour de France team, had it known there was a violation of the sponsorship contract based on performance enhancing drug use and blood transfusions. The federal government is attempting to have the damages related to sponsorship fees tripled, based on the False Claims Act. Armstrong could be held accountable for the entire amount.

Much of this case will focus on 1) terms of contract and purported breach and 2) sponsorship value to the United States Postal Service. Did the sponsor achieve a proportionate return on investment?
I won't be able to write on the terms of contract. I am not privy to th…